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Posted inThe PitchUncategorized

Business Council CEO Bob Jensen steps down

Business Council CEO Bob Jensen steps down

— February 28, 2014

Wyoming Business Council CEO Bob Jensen will step down at the end of March, according to a press release from Gov. Matt Mead’s office. Jensen said he needs to spend more time with his wife who has multiple sclerosis.

Bob Jensen

Jensen led the Business Council for more than 10 years, through a time of significant economic growth in Wyoming.

“It has been a great pleasure to work with Bob,” Gov. Mead said in a prepared statement. “I saw his leadership as governor and as a member of the Business Council Board of Directors. He cares deeply about the state. Bob has been tireless in his pursuit of economic opportunities for Wyoming communities and has done so in a thoughtful manner.”

Mead listed several notable economic development projects that took place under Jensen’s tenure as CEO:

— Expansion of the rail industry in Evanston, Casper, Upton and Cheyenne;

— Infrastructure improvement allowing for growth of the digital industry such as the Sheridan Tech Park;

— Recruitment of technology companies like Microsoft and projects including the NCAR Wyoming Supercomputing Center;

— Expansion of Wyoming data centers like Green House Data and Ptolemy;

— Growth of the manufacturing sector in Gillette with investment in a vibrant business park;

— Creation of jobs in the northwest part of the state with support for Cody Labs; and

— Advanced energy technologies that have the potential to benefit many areas of the state.

“The past 10 years have been the best work experience of my life,” Jensen said in a prepared statement. “Being associated with knowledgeable local economic development leaders, supportive governors and legislators, and such a high-caliber staff has been an incredible privilege. I am confident the future is bright for Wyoming.”

His resignation is effective March 28, 2014.

SUPPORT: If you enjoy WyoFile’s coverage of Wyoming people, places and policy, and you would like to see more quality Wyoming journalism, please consider supporting us. WyoFile is a non-partisan, non-profit news organization dedicated to in-depth reporting on Wyoming’s people, places and policy.
 
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Posted inThe PitchUncategorized

Business Council CEO Bob Jensen steps down

Business Council CEO Bob Jensen steps down

— February 28, 2014

Wyoming Business Council CEO Bob Jensen will step down at the end of March, according to a press release from Gov. Matt Mead’s office. Jensen said he needs to spend more time with his wife who has multiple sclerosis.

Bob Jensen

Jensen led the Business Council for more than 10 years, through a time of significant economic growth in Wyoming.

“It has been a great pleasure to work with Bob,” Gov. Mead said in a prepared statement. “I saw his leadership as governor and as a member of the Business Council Board of Directors. He cares deeply about the state. Bob has been tireless in his pursuit of economic opportunities for Wyoming communities and has done so in a thoughtful manner.”

Mead listed several notable economic development projects that took place under Jensen’s tenure as CEO:

— Expansion of the rail industry in Evanston, Casper, Upton and Cheyenne;

— Infrastructure improvement allowing for growth of the digital industry such as the Sheridan Tech Park;

— Recruitment of technology companies like Microsoft and projects including the NCAR Wyoming Supercomputing Center;

— Expansion of Wyoming data centers like Green House Data and Ptolemy;

— Growth of the manufacturing sector in Gillette with investment in a vibrant business park;

— Creation of jobs in the northwest part of the state with support for Cody Labs; and

— Advanced energy technologies that have the potential to benefit many areas of the state.

“The past 10 years have been the best work experience of my life,” Jensen said in a prepared statement. “Being associated with knowledgeable local economic development leaders, supportive governors and legislators, and such a high-caliber staff has been an incredible privilege. I am confident the future is bright for Wyoming.”

His resignation is effective March 28, 2014.

SUPPORT: If you enjoy WyoFile’s coverage of Wyoming people, places and policy, and you would like to see more quality Wyoming journalism, please consider supporting us. WyoFile is a non-partisan, non-profit news organization dedicated to in-depth reporting on Wyoming’s people, places and policy.
 
REPUBLISH THIS STORY: For details on how you can republish this story or other WyoFile content for free, click here.

Leave a comment

Want to join the discussion? Fantastic, here are the ground rules: * Provide your full name — no pseudonyms. WyoFile stands behind everything we publish and expects commenters to do the same. * No personal attacks, profanity, discriminatory language or threats. Keep it clean, civil and on topic. *WyoFile does not fact check every comment but, when noticed, submissions containing clear misinformation, demonstrably false statements of fact or links to sites trafficking in such will not be posted. *Individual commenters are limited to three comments per story, including replies.

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *