The moon rises over a coal silo at the Dry Fork Mine just north of Gillette. The Dry Fork Mine feeds the Dry Fork Power Station, where the Integrated Test Center is being constructed. (Andrew Graham/WyoFile)

The moon rises over a coal silo at the Dry Fork Mine just north of Gillette.

The Dry Fork Mine feeds coal to the neighboring Dry Fork Station, which began operation in 2011. The mine also supplies coal to plants in North Dakota, Texas and central Wyoming, according to the management company Western Fuels Association’s website.

Platts Analytics reports that Powder River Basin coal saw an increase in production of 2 percent during the first full week of September, but remains down 25 percent from the year before. Still, in town people point hopefully to the uptick in activity as a good sign for the local economy.

Andrew Graham

Andrew Graham is reporting for WyoFile from Laramie. He covers state government, energy and the economy. Reach him at 443-848-8756 or at andrew@wyofile.com, follow him @AndrewGraham88

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